My Favorite Audiobooks of 2017

4 01 2018

I did a horrible job tracking my books this year. Actually did pretty good for the first few months, then stopped for a while. Combing through my various social media and book related sites I came up with a list of about 100 Books I listened to, and another 20 Novels, Novellas and Anthologies I read. In no real particular order, my favorite books of 2017 are:

Waking Gods

Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel

Random House Audio

Cast of Narrators:
Andy Secombe – Interviewer
Eric Meyers – Headings
Roy McMillan – Jacob Lawson
Laurel Lefkow – Rose Franklin
Adna Sablylich – Marina Antoniou AKA Alyssa Papantoniou
Charlie Anson – Vincent Couture; Jamie
Christopher Ragland – Ryan Mitchell; Lieutenant General Alan A Simms
William Hope – Mr Burns; Eugene Govender
Madeleine Rose – Kara Resnik
Karina Fernandez – Eva Reyes
Olivia Dowd – Sarah Kent
Sarah Wells – Deborah Horsburgh

 

The Power

The Power by Naomi Alderman

Hachette Audio

Narrated by Adjoa Andoh

American War

American War by Omar El Akkad

Random House Audio

Narrated by Dion Graham

Lola

Lola by Melissa Scrivner Love

Random House Audio

Narrated by Roxanna Ortega

Reincarnation Blue

Reincarnation Blues by Michael Poore

Random House Audio

Narrated by Mark Bramhall

The One Eyed Man

The One Eyed Man by Ron Currie

Highbridge Audio

Narrated by Kevin Pariseau

The Changeling

The Changeling by Victor LaValle

Random House Audio

Read by The Author

MEDDLING kIDS

Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero

Random House Audio

Narrated by Kyla Garcia

Sea of Rust

Sea of Rust by C. Robert Cargill

Harper Audio

Narrated by Eva Kaminsky

Flashmob

Flashmob by Christopher Farnsworth

Harper Audio

Narrated by Bronson Pinchot

Kill the next One.jpg

Kill The Next One by Federico Axat

Hachette Audio

Narrated by Maxwell Hamilton

After On

After On by Rob Reid

Random House Audio

Narrated by Sean Kenin and January LaVoy, with:
Felicia Day: NETGRRRL.COM
Patrick Rothfuss: Special Field Operative Brock Hogan
John Hodgman: Charles Henry Higgensworth III
Tom Merritt: voice of The New York Times
Jesse Cox:  Whistle Blowings Blog
Leo Laporte: voice of the San Francisco Chronicle

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Audiobook Review: Ghost Walk by Brian Keene

30 04 2017

Ghost Walk

Ghost Walk by Brian Keene

Read by Chet Williamson

Crossroad Press

Grade: B

I have had a very sporadic love affair with Brian Keene. Well, at least his books. I’ve loved many of his books, particularly is apocalyptic novels, but have only read a few of his more traditional horror novels. Now that he has a deal with Crossroads Press to release his books into audio, I plan to flesh out my collection. My first foray into this is Ghost Walk, the loose follow up to his novel Dark Hollow. Ghost Walk is a serviceable one-off horror tale of a Halloween Attraction gone tragically awry due to supernatural interventions. Yet, where it truly excels in it’s place in Brian Keene’s larger mythos and in particular, the introduction of one of his reoccurring character, Levi Stoltzfus. One thing you learn quickly in Brian Keene’s scarred from their encounters with the entities from the labyrinth, and the implications of these scars ripple out beyond the ending of any particular book. Ghost Walk is old school horror that truly is horrific.

Chet Williamson is one of those narrators that isn’t always my cup of tea. He has more of the old school style akin to many of the originals big voices of audiobook Narration like George Guidall or Richard Ferrone. I’m not typically a fan of this style yet occasionally, with the right book it works. I though his performance in Keene’s The Complex was outstanding. I wasn’t as enamored here, but as the book played out, and things seemed to get more bizarre and crazy I fell under his spell. Williamson is strongest in this genre, and he delivers a solid performance that is suited to this book.





Audiobook Review: Pilot X by Tom Merritt

29 04 2017


Pilot X by Tom Merritt

Read by Kevin T. Collins

Audible Studios

Grade: B+

Many yeas ago a reviewer called the latest release by a band I liked “a blatant U2 ripoff.” The members of that band took those words as a compliment. So, in that vein, Tom Merritt’s novel, Pilot X is a blatant Dr. Who ripoff in the best possible way. It’s a timey whimey high stakes adventure full of colorful aliens, a main character whose engaging and charmingly out of his depths, a spaceship with more personality than most human literary characters and enough head spinning, reality altering time travel shenanigans to keep the reader unsure if they are even supposed to be guessing. Merritt balances seriousness and absurdist human at a level at least in the ballpark of Douglas Adams and delivers a clever engaging story to boot. 
I always enjoy Kevin T. Collins, and you could just tell he was having a lot of fun with this book. From Cyborgs and Alien Hive Minds to officious bureaucrats Collins delivers without ever going cartoonishly over the top but still managing to capture the humor in the text. His pacing is crisp, building the tension, keeping the listening engaged in the story. If you want so good old fashion science fiction fun, you can’t really do better than Pilot X. 





Audiobook Review: A Criminal Defense by William L. Meyers, Jr.

25 04 2017


A Criminal Defense by William L. Myers, Jr.

Read by Peter Berkrot

Brilliance Audio

Grade: C

So many legal thrillers are about a crusading defense attorney protecting the fragile rights of his downtrodden client against an over zealous prosecutor in a system skewed against them. Yet A Criminal Defense takes a different approach. It’s about a whiney entitled lawyer and a menagerie of asshats fighting an asshole prosecutor to protect a rich, unlikeable megalomaniac. All the characters are so unlikeable that despite how well constructed the lawyers intricate plans are you hope they all come crashing down and everyone involved is locked up in a shipping crate and sent out to sea, never to return. William L. Meyers delivers a lot of smart twists and managed to surprise me more than once yet all that was in service of characters who I just couldn’t find the latest motivation to care an iota about. 
I’m a fan of Peter Berkrot. With the right book he can suck you right into the story. Maybe this just wasn’t the right story. He just seemed like he was trying too hard. Most of these characters were that extra dull flavor of vanilla and had the personalities of robots stuck in the perpetual blue screen of death and trying to breathe life into them was about as futile as doing CPR on a crash test dummy. Plus, the first time I heard him call Wawa “Wall-Wah” I wanted to throw my delicious hot Wawa coffee in his face. (I’m a very sensitive Wawa enthusiast.) Part of my issue is that as a Philadelphian, I expect books set in Philly to have a Philly feel that just wasn’t there. Overall, this was the odd meshing of being impressed by the writer and intrigued by future work but hating this particular novel. 





Audiobook Review: Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuval 

21 04 2017


Waking Gods (Book 2 of the Themis Files) by Sylvain Neuvel

Read by a Full Cast

Random House Audio

Grade: A

I am a 43 year old man who grew up on proper grammar and professional distance. I take my role in the thoughtful analysis of fiction through the spoken word seriously. I am not given to hyperbole or flamboyance in my writings. I am not in touch with the hip slang or latest trending meme. I am not some tech savy YA reviewer who uses emoji and gifs as a modern form of hieroglyphic language to portray their enthusiasm for the latest release from the favorite authors. Giving these limitations as a reviewer, I can best sum up my experience with Waking Gods, the sequel to Sylvain Nueval’s Sleeping Giants as thus…

HOLY SHIT!!!

I truly apologize for the profanity, use of ALL CAPS, and overuse of exclamation points. But really…

OMGOMGHOLYSHITWTFWTFROBOTSOHSHITCOMEONMANOMGOMG!
Ok, I know many of you still like some sort of visual prop to express my delight at this book, so this was basically my emotional state while listening to this audiobook.

giphy

It’s next to impossible to evaluate Waking Gods the novel, and Waking Gods the audiobook experience separately. Honestly, if I simply read the text I am sure I would have thoroughly enjoyed it, but I highly doubt that I would have squealed orgasmically so loud that my neighbors dog started simultaneous humping his Chewbacca throw pillow. Random House Audio has  created a rock and roll blockbuster of an audiobook experience that at times gave me chills, made me cringe and had me jumping up like I was an Ecstasy fueled time traveler at a Nirvana concert.

Fans of Sleeping Giants think they know what to expert. They do, if they multiply their expectation exponentially. Waking Gods is more than an audiobook. It’s an audiobook experience dipped in chocolate, laced in meth, and smashed repeatedly into your brain.

I think I liked it.





Audiobook Review: In the Darkness, That’s Where I’ll Know You: The Complete Black Room Story by Luke Smitherd

19 04 2017


In the Darkness, That’s Where I’ll Know You: The Complete Black Room Story by Luke Smitherd

Read by Luke Smitherd

Flying Body Press

Grade: B

I was in a bit of a rut. I had started two very smart, clever science fiction novels and found myself in awe of the writing and impressed with the concepts but not actually enjoying the experience. So I said, screw it, give me something fun. I had downloaded In the Darkness, That’s Where I’ll Know You a while back after thoroughly enjoying Luke Smitherd’s The Stone Man and than forgot about it. I started it as a desperation move, hoping to get my groove back and I’m glad I did. This novel, the complete version of his Black Room was truly a Bob novel, a weird physic novel full of likable everyday characters and awkward romance. Smitherd tells a tale with dark themes balanced out by goofy humor. It was both smart and good fun, never taking itself too seriously just delivering an entertaining read. 
One of the reasons I hesitated on listening to this was that it was narrated by the author. Smitherd has a nice voice but as us rabid audiophiles know, a nice voice isn’t enough. There were plenty of flaws with his reading. His pacing in the beginning was a bit awkward. The biggest issue was with the perspective transitions, they were often too fluid, not allowing you to realize you moved from one POV to another, which lead to a dissonant feeling pulling you momentarily out of the story. Yet besides these issues, I found myself enjoying the narration. He manages the tongue in cheek humor with a British subtlety that perfectly suited the story and his enthusiasm for the story was infectious. While a professional narrator could have enhanced the experience, don’t let the fact that the author narrated the tale scare you off. 





Audiobook Review: The Dark Room by Jonathan Moore

13 04 2017


The Dark Room by Jonathan Moore

Read by David Colacci

Highbridge Audio

Grade B
The Dark Room, Jonathan Moore’s loosely related follow up to The Poison Artist, was not the book I expected. Crime fiction is full of the twisted antihero. Police Procedurals tend to focus on gruff, lone wolf, self destructive detectives who push the boundaries of the law to get justice. So, when I slowly began to realize that the main character of this novel, Gavin Cain was a competent, well adjusted and likeable police detective, I was like… What the hell! The Dark Room is a solid mystery full of noir atmosphere that should delight hard core crime fiction fans. It was well written, full of dark twists, hidden secrets and memorable characters. Yet, like The Poison Artist, I think I respected the writing and appreciated the storytelling more than I actually enjoyed it. It was one of those experiences where I wanted to race to the end partly because I wanted to know what happened, but mostly because I was ready to move on to the next book in my queue. 
So, David Colacci narrated this book. I’m not so sure what else to say. You basically know what you’re gonna get when Colacci reads a book. Typically solid, easily listenable but rarely will you be blown away by his performance. His pacing is solid but his characters are pretty exchangeable and his British accent was at best, dull. Overall, I’d put The Dark Room in the upper tier of crime fiction but I also don’t see it as a book that will linger in my mind for any significant amount of time.