Audiobook Review: Breakers by Edward W. Robertson

30 08 2013

Breakers by Edward W. Robertson

Read by Ray Chase

Podium Publishing

Length: 12 Hrs 10 Min

Genre: Post Apocalyptic

Quick Thoughts: Edward W. Robertson’s Breakers is a mish mash of classic Post Apocalyptic tales, blending a world ending pandemic and an alien invasion together to make a novel that fans of the subgenre will delight in. If you love books that embrace their comparisons to The Stand, and you love watching humans with nothing left to lose kill crab-like alien invaders with laser guns, well, get yourself a copy of Breakers post haste.

Grade: B+

(Breakers is scheduled for release September 5th, 2013. Preorder Today)

Space travel is not easy. We here on this lovely planet we call Earth have seen this. We have sent men to the moon, and rovers to Mars. We have sent probes deep into our solar system, and hopefully beyond. Yet, we have suffered catastrophes, set backs and the loss of public faith. Many people question whether it’s worth our time and money to head out into the darkness of space when we have people starving on our own planet. So, any species that can overcome these technical, social and financial burdens to actually create a mothership and sent it millions of light years across the vastness of space in order to destroy humanity and occupy earth would have to be a highly advanced species. It’s pretty much a given that any such aliens would assuredly kick our sorry asses. So, why is there so much alien invasion fiction? How can you create any tension when the balance of power is so great? This is handled by fictions writer’s greatest tool… the BUT…. In Harry Turtledove’s Worldwar series, The Race, the invading reptilian species, came to Earth during World War 2 with overwhelming force and advanced technology ready to defeat the barbarians and take over the planet BUT… they were in such a state of cultural stagnation with an inability to adapt that they were surprised to find the Earth had progressed significantly from the probes they had sent back in the 12th Century. In Larry Niven’s Footfall the elephantine Fitph traveled from Alpha Centauri intent on taking over earth BUT… their advanced technology was not their own but inherited from a former species that viewed them almost as pets. And don’t forget the alien invaders in Independence Day who were ready to lay the smack down on earth, BUT… for some reasoned designed their computer system to be compatible with Earths, and forgot to update their Norton Antivirus. Luckily for Earth, most of these species, whether they be Lizards wearing human skins, or slug creatures who bond with human hosts, always came with at least one BUT… that us pesky humans will always figure out how to exploit.

When a mysterious plague hit the earth, spreading like wildfire through the populace, Walt Lawson is devastated by the loss of his girlfriend. Now, on the verge of suicide, Walt decides to walk from New York City to Los Angeles, the city his actress girlfriend Vanessa dreamed of moving to, fully expecting to die along the way. Meanwhile, in California, Raymond James and his wife Mia, find their financial struggles are over when the majority of the world dies. They set up a haven in an idyllic home on the coast, finding happiness in their simple life. Yet, when the alien mothership appears in the horizon, and the crab like occupants begin killing or rounding up humans, the survivors find a new purpose, fighting the menace that has devastated their planet. Edward W. Robertson’s Breakers is a mish mash of classic Post Apocalyptic tales, blending a world ending pandemic and an alien invasion together to make a novel that fans of the subgenre will delight in. Instead of avoiding seeming like a retread of novels like The Stand and Footfall, Robertson embraces this, as he very well should. The Stand is a great novel which has helped create a generation of Post Apocalyptic fans, and I am often flabbergasted how some authors go out of their way to avoid looking like a copycat of it. I found Robertson’s characterizations very interesting. I started off pretty much hating both Walt and Ray. To me, they seem like two sides of the same loser coin. In many ways they were like mirror images of the other, with Ray being kind but stupid loser and Walt being a manipulative and brash loser. Yet both characters, especially Walt, grew on me. Walt’s slide into self hate may have made him the perfect survivor for the times, and by the time the book hit the alien invasion part, he was responsible for some of the most laugh out loud funny moments, despite his dark personality. The plot and action was fun, bordering on cheesy. While the guerilla tactics to fight the aliens often lacked descriptive depth, the plot moved along quickly and never left you bored. My only major complaint was I would have liked to seen a bit more diversity in the character types and greater depth in the peripheral characters, and since this is the first in a series I expect my wish will come true. The novel built up to a finale that was equal parts “that’s the corniest thing ever” and “holy hell, this is awesome.” If you’re looking for some hoity toity new exploration that defies apocalyptic tropes to create a new approach to the genre, keep looking. But, if you love books that embrace their comparison to The Stand, and love watching humans with nothing left to lose kill alien invaders with laser guns, well, get yourself a copy of Breakers post haste.

In the early part of the novel, I struggled a bit differentiating Walt from Ray. While I liked Ray Chase’s voice, the voices between these two characters were very similar, and caused some early dissonance. Luckily, once things got rolling and the author began to flesh out these characters, and they began to transform into what they would become by the end of the book, this no longer became an issue.  Once this issue was resolved I was more than happy to fall into the capable voice of Ray Chase. He has a deep voice, bordering on gruff, but softens it with a rhythmic style that is reminiscent of Scott Brick. His reading style added levels to the prose that I feel elevated it, giving Walt’s journey across a devastated America an almost stream of consciences feel, and Ray and Mia’s time in their dream home an overwhelming sense of contentment.  This was my first time listening to Ray Chase, and I really liked him. I think some of the struggles he had with some of the characterizations came more from the fact that some of the characters were a bit cardboard, but he did what he could to bring them to life. When the author gave a character depth, you could feel it in the narrator’s performance. Based on this performance, Ray Chase is a narrator to be on the lookout for. Hopefully, we will see more audio versions of this series, with Chase acting as our guide in the fight against the alien crab things.

Thanks to Podium Publish for proving me with a copy of the title for review.

This review is part of my weekly “Welcome to the Apocalypse” theme. Click on the image below for links to more posts.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: